Bird flu case found in southern Wisconsin chicken flock?

The government stated in a statement that samples from the flock were examined at the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory and verified at the National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, Iowa.

The ranch in southern Wisconsin’s Jefferson County, roughly 50 miles west of Milwaukee, has been quarantined by state animal health authorities. According to the USDA, all of the chickens in the flock will be killed and will not be consumed.

Since avian influenza was recently identified in a few of states, including Indiana and Iowa, farms that grow turkeys and chickens for human consumption have been on high alert and taking efforts to improve biosecurity. Producers are concerned about a repetition of the 2015 bird flu epidemic, which killed 50 million birds in 15 states and cost the federal government almost $1 billion.

Avian influenza is a virus that spreads quickly among chickens by nasal and ocular secretions, as well as dung. Wild birds, interaction with sick poultry, equipment, and caretakers’ clothes and shoes may all transfer the infection from flock to flock.

The government stated in a statement that samples from the flock were examined at the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory and verified at the National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, Iowa.

The ranch in southern Wisconsin’s Jefferson County, roughly 50 miles (80 kilometers) west of Milwaukee, has been quarantined by state animal health authorities. According to the USDA, all of the chickens in the flock will be killed and will not be consumed.

Since avian influenza was recently identified in a few of states, including Indiana and Iowa, farms that grow turkeys and chickens for human consumption have been on high alert and taking efforts to improve biosecurity. Producers are concerned about a repetition of the 2015 bird flu epidemic, which killed 50 million birds in 15 states and cost the federal government almost $1 billion.

Since avian influenza was recently identified in a few of states, including Indiana and Iowa, farms that grow turkeys and chickens for human consumption have been on high alert and taking efforts to improve biosecurity. Producers are concerned about a repetition of the 2015 bird flu epidemic, which killed 50 million birds in 15 states and cost the federal government almost $1 billion.

Avian influenza is a virus that spreads quickly among chickens by nasal and ocular secretions, as well as dung. Wild birds, interaction with sick poultry, equipment, and caretakers’ clothes and shoes may all transfer the infection from flock to flock.

The new bird flu detections, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, do not pose an imminent public health threat. In the United States, no human instances of these avian influenza viruses have been discovered.

For the first time since 2015, bird flu has been discovered on a Wisconsin farm.

(AP) — MADISON, Wis. — Bird flu has been discovered in a commercial poultry business in Wisconsin, according to the US Department of Agriculture. Samples from the flock were analyzed at the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory and verified at the National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, Iowa, according to the USDA. The ranch in southern Wisconsin’s Jefferson County, roughly 50 miles west of Milwaukee, has been quarantined by state animal health authorities. According to the USDA, all of the chickens in the flock will be killed and will not be consumed. The new bird flu detections, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, do not pose an imminent public health threat.

According to Dr. Darlene Konkle, Wisconsin state veterinarian, the samples were analyzed at the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, and the findings were validated by the National Veterinary Services Laboratories.

According to Konkle, state and federal regulators are working with the farm owner to cull the facility’s almost 3 million laying hens. The birds will not be utilized for food, and no chicken products will be transferred from the premises.

Officials are also keeping an eye on the farm owners’ other flocks in the area, but Konkle said there had been no signs of the virus spreading further.

“Our primary goal is to prevent the virus from spreading to other wild birds or domestic birds, whether in household flocks or commercial flocks. As a result, we must act immediately “she said

The source of the infection on the afflicted farm, according to Konkle, has yet to be established. This spring, avian influenza has been observed in wild ducks in many different states.

The 2015 avian influenza epidemic in Wisconsin killed more than 1.9 million birds in less than a month, affecting nine commercial flocks and one private flock.

Officials don’t know how the new strain of the virus compares to the one observed in 2015, but the fatality rate recorded by the afflicted farm suggests it’s as deadly, according to Konkle.

“This virus hasn’t been seen in the United States in a long time. The first cases were discovered in wild birds around the holidays “According to Konkle. “As far as I’m aware, it affects poultry species, which include our typical chickens and turkeys, as well as other sorts of birds that individuals may rear, such as peacocks and backyard ducks.”

Officials are working with the farm owner on a strategy to get rid of the birds, according to Konkle. ?

The ranch in southern Wisconsin’s Jefferson County, roughly 50 miles (80 kilometers) west of Milwaukee, has been quarantined by state animal health authorities. According to the USDA, all of the chickens in the flock will be killed and will not be consumed.

Since avian influenza was recently identified in a few of states, including Indiana and Iowa, farms that grow turkeys and chickens for human consumption have been on high alert and taking efforts to improve biosecurity. Producers are concerned about a repetition of the 2015 bird flu epidemic, which killed 50 million birds in 15 states and cost the federal government almost $1 billion.

Avian influenza is a virus that spreads quickly among chickens by nasal and ocular secretions, as well as dung. Wild birds, interaction with sick poultry, equipment, and caretakers’ clothes and shoes may all transfer the infection from flock to flock.

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